• Brief Profile


    Dr. Youlten is Visiting Consultant in the Department of Allergy at Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, Consultant and Medical Director the London Allergy Clinic, Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, a Fellow of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians and Doctor of Philosophy of London University. Lawrence Youlten was a medical graduate at Guy's Hospital, University of London. He was then appointed as a lecturer in the Sherrington School of Physiology at St. Thomas's Hospital Medical School and went on to become a senior lecturer in the Physiology department of the London Hospital Medical College, where he was awarded a PhD for his work on Vascular Permeability. This was followed by his appointment as senior lecturer in the Pharmacology Department of the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences at the Royal College of Surgeons where he was involved in basic research into physiology and pharmacology of vascular response to inflammation. Between 1979 and 1992, he combined clinical work in allergy and asthma with a position in Clinical Pharmacology Department of Beecham (later Smithkline Beecham). In 1989 he was appointed Director of Clinical Pharmacology Compliance, SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals where he was responsible for Phase 1 and early Phase 2 studies of candidate drugs in the areas of asthma, allergy, thrombosis, diabetes, obesity and related metabolic diseases. From 1977 to 1997 he was a consultant in the Allergy Department at Guy's Hospital, London. He is a former member of Council and Secretary of British Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. He has particular interest in rhinitis and asthma and in anaphylaxis and related problems, including drug related anaphylaxis and insect venom allergy. He has published approximately 60 papers on scientific and medical topics mainly referring to allergy and its fundamental mechanisms.

Questions Answered by me

Food allergy is an immunologically mediated phenomenon, the most common form being Type I IgE mediated food reactions. These vary in severity  from "...
Answered on : 02 Sep 2013

Without a clearer description of your rash it is hard to be sure whether you are describing eczema (skin broken, peeling or blistered) or...

Answered on : 30 Jun 2011

Asthalin is salbutamol, a reliever inhaler whose effects will generally wear off in a few hours, and which has no preventive effect. Rather than...

Answered on : 17 May 2011

The description you give fits "urticaria", sometimes called "hives" or "nettle rash". When this is an ongoing problem, as in your case, it is not...

Answered on : 27 Jan 2011

It is possible that you have eczema and would benefit from seeing a dermatologist. Avoiding the foods that you know make things worse and avoiding...

Answered on : 13 Jan 2011

A high level of IgE such asl you describe probably just reflects the fact that you are atopic, that is, you are, like about a third of the...

Answered on : 01 Jan 2011

The problem may not be allergy, and it is not quite clear from your description what the nature of the patient's symptoms is. It may be chronic...

Answered on : 11 Oct 2010

Antihistamines may help your symptoms, particularly if they are intermittent. Another approach would be regular preventive use of a nasal steroid...

Answered on : 14 Apr 2010

Use of a salbutamol inhaler before exercise to prevent exercise-induced asthma is a safe and accepted way of dealing with this problem. Use of a...

Answered on : 02 Apr 2010

Immunotherapy for house dust mite allergy is not currently practised in the UK. It has generally been more difficult
to show benefit for...

Answered on : 24 Feb 2010
  • Dr Lawrence   Youlten's picture
  • Addenbrookes
    United States